Free Teach-In with Dr. Samuel Yanuck for Clinicians

“It’s essential that natural approaches for patients with SARS-Cov2 do two things: support efficient anti-viral immune surveillance and also quiet inflammation, so there’s enough room for the inherently inflammatory process of killing pathogens to take place without moving the patient too close to the threshold of ARDS manifestation.” – Dr. Yanuck COVID-19 solutions are an…

Doctor intubates patient dummy in the operating room for ventilation for pneumonia in infectious diseases such as corona or influenza

For physicians called to inpatient care – a refresher on ventilation management

For those physicians called to the hospital front lines, MedCram has a free video series on mechanical ventilation. From MedCram: “We understand that medical professionals (and students) that don’t have significant experience with mechanical ventilation may be called upon to help ventilator management teams in critical care settings. And clinicians with extensive ventilator experience may want a refresher or a tool to aid in teaching mechanical ventilation strategies to other clinicians.” They also have another class on ARDS. Also free. 

In severe cases, it’s the potentially-fatal cytokine storm that needs interruption

Quenching the cytokine storm. In part, it might be our own immune system – made dysfunctional, imbalanced in its hyper response to certain viruses (COVID19, influenza) – that needs interruption. Two key interventions are topping my list: Omega 3 fatty acids for their ability to generate specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs). Or, since some of…

SARS

A few additional treatment possibilities in COVID19 (SARS Cov-2) addressing furin-like cleavage and pyroptosis (caspacin-1 activation of inflammasome NLRP3)

The cytokine storm seen in SARS Cov1 and Cov2 might be due to chronic pyroptosis activation. However, known activators of NLRP3 in SARS-CoV differ from CoV2.  While SARS Cov1 and COVID19 are genetically very similar, the extraordinarily high rate of infectivity of COVID19 is unique. Prepublication research suggests the cause might be a unique furin-like cleavage site on the spike protein of Cov2 that was absent in Cov1.