KARA FITZGERALD, ND completed a post-doctorate in nutritional biochemistry/laboratory science with Richard Lord, Ph.D. Author: Case Studies in Integrative and Functional Medicine, contributing author: Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative and Functional Medicine; IFM’s Textbook for Functional Medicine. She lectures globally on functional medicine; is on faculty at IFM and practices in Connecticut.

Healthy food containing iodine. Products rich in I

Iodine Deficiency, Breast Health, and Hormone Balance

Iodine was discovered in 1811 by French chemist Bernard Courtois while processing ingredients for gunpowder. In extracting sodium salts from seaweed by treating it with sulfuric acid, he observed a purple vapor rising from the seaweed. This substance was eventually named iodine, from the Greek word for the color violet, ioeides. Iodine is an essential trace element necessary for the production of all hormones in the body and proper function in the immune system.[2] It plays a vital role in several aspects of health, including:

Podcast cover art

Functional Interventions for Men’s Health in Aging and Prostate Cancer with Dr. Geo Espinosa

We’ve been eager to put together a podcast on men’s health – prostate cancer, low testosterone, foundational vitamin and botanical supplements, nutritional interventions – and folks, it’s finally here! There’s a wealth of GREAT pearls to bring into your own practice from this month’s interview with our guest Dr. Geo Espinosa, ND. Dr. Geo is a long-time friend, a fellow naturopathic functional medicine physician, and a (if not “the”) definitive voice in neurology and men’s health. His passion about men’s health helped him bridge the gap between conventional and naturopathic medicine. Together we discuss how to engage men in self-care, specific nutritional interventions to support men’s health, laboratory panels and optimal ranges, and some of his favorite vitamins and botanicals for his male patients.

Ingredients for Dukkah Spice Blend

Ancient Dukkah Spice Blend

From Nutrition resident: Jacquelyn Lombari Adapted from: Cannelle et Vanille   The nutritional importance of spices can often be overlooked; however, they are a great way to add both flavor and medicinal benefits to your home cooking regime. Dukkah (derived from the Arabic word “to crush”) is a versatile spice blend originating from ancient Egypt…

Podcast cover art

Managing Chronic Stress in Patient Care with Dr. Susan Blum

Let’s face it, folks – we are all grappling with various levels of stress right now. As if chronic stress wasn’t already a top contributor to general health ailments and chronic disease, now add stress from social isolation, the pandemic, and political strife to the list. That’s why we are so grateful to welcome Dr. Susan Blum MD to New Frontiers. Dr. Blum has worked in preventative medicine as a chronic disease specialist for nearly two decades and is the founder and director of Blum Center for Health.

Autoimmune

Autoantibodies Caused by COVID-19 Increase Risk of Severe Early COVID & Long COVID

A new report suggests that COVID-19 patients have increased autoantibodies, resulting in an increased risk of severe early and long COVID-19 symptoms.  Autoantibodies represent a misdirection of our natural immune response towards “self” tissue.  Researchers from Yale School of Medicine tested 194 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients for autoantibodies and found a dramatic increase in autoimmune reactivity compared to…

Cake that looks like a brain

Your Brain Remembers Where High-Calorie Food Is Located: Don’t Bring it into Your Home

People appear to subconsciously remember the location of high-calorie foods better than other, healthier foods, suggesting that bringing these foods into your home may sabotage even the best intentions and strongest will for healthy eating or weight loss.   A study published in Nature investigated “high-calorie spatial memory bias” to better understand whether human memory is biased toward…

Woman having painful stomach ache during working from home,Female suffering from abdominal pain,Period cramps,Hands squeezing belly,Stomach pain

Uterine Fibroids: Mechanisms, Treatment Challenges and the Power of Embracing a Functional Approach

Uterine fibroids are a huge, underappreciated issue. They are the most common gynecological disorder, affecting nearly half of women younger than 40 years old, and far more (~80%) for those older. Frankly, I don’t think we are doing enough to help these patients. Fibroids are the leading indication for hysterectomy in the US, accounting for 39% of all hysterectomies each year, and while some are asymptomatic, symptoms include heavy and prolonged periods, difficulty with intercourse, bowel dysfunction, non-cyclic pelvic pain, low back pain, urinary frequency and urgency, and constipation. Because not all fibroids cause heavy bleeding, their impact can be missed, think: refractory constipation or incontinence. Conventional treatments include pharmacotherapy, surgical interventions, and uterine artery embolization, however, these treatments leave much to be desired. Oral contraceptives are used to manage bleeding, and even after myomectomy, fibroids often recur and 10% of women will undergo hysterectomy within 5 – 10 years.